Occupational physician: Effect of electrosmog not detectable

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Occupational physician: Effect of electrosmog not detectable
Occupational physician: Effect of electrosmog not detectable
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Occupational physician: Effect of electrosmog not detectable

Electromagnetic fields do not appear to have any harmful effects on humans within the limit values There is no evidence that electrical or magnetic fields have any harmful effects on humans within the legal limit values. This was explained by the occupational physician Oswald Jahn from the Vienna University Clinic for Internal Medicine at the joint research forum Electromagnetic Fields. According to Jahn, studies that have found such an effect are demonstrably inadequate.

Jahn mentioned studies that have found an increase in leukemia among people who live under power lines. On closer inspection, the results of these investigations are dubious and scientifically untenable, says the expert. Comparative studies of workers in substations who are exposed to relatively strong electrical and magnetic fields have also found no evidence of changes or even damage to the organism.

The workers were exposed to weak and strong fields in a controlled manner, and their circulation and hormone situation as well as their well-being were regularly checked or asked about. According to the current status, suspected mutagenic or carcinogenic effects can also be ruled out.

In order to rule out interference from the measurement itself, magnetic fields are now measured in larger areas, such as in substations, with a series of sensors that transmit their results to the base station via radio transmitters. "Until now, the main problem was the wiring of such measurements," said Wolfgang Hadrian from the Institute for Electrical Systems and High Voltage Technology at the Technical University of Vienna. The so-called telemetric measuring method with radio support also delivers exact results about the conditions of the magnetic fields under high-voltage lines.

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